How do we use social media to market our books?

6 July 2017

We at Multilingual Matters/Channel View Publications are very active on social media and have built up substantial communities across all our accounts. We enjoy interacting with our authors, publishing contacts, readers and people with a broader interest in the topics on which we publish, and have strong followings on both Facebook and Twitter, with nearly 2,000 contacts across our Facebook pages and over 15,000 on our two Twitter accounts.

Social media has also become an integral part of our marketing campaign for each book that we publish. In the weeks and months leading up to and following a book’s publication, we in the marketing department use our various social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, this blog and YouTube) to announce its publication and publicise it as much as possible. It’s the easiest and most effective way of getting news to lots of people at once and on top of that, it allows people to engage with and discuss our publications, both with us and amongst each other. Of course, social media doesn’t come at the expense of our traditional marketing strategies and we still follow usual marketing techniques such as catalogue mailings, email newsletters, sending information to the book trade, attending conferences and book fairs and so on, but it does offer something new and different to our marketing repertoire.

Commissioning editors with books published in January

When using social media to market a book, it’s a real advantage if we have an author who is active themselves on social media and can help us to spread the word. Authors are best placed to reach their book’s key audience as their own colleagues and peers are likely to be those interested in the research. We often find that some of our bestselling books are ones where the author hasn’t been afraid of get stuck in! For example, you could create a Facebook page for your book like our authors Christian W. Chun and Leanne White did, where you can keep people up to date with the book’s progress and share useful information and news, including the 50% preorder discount flyer we create for all our books. In addition, if there are any relevant events that tie in with your book’s publication, do let us know! For example, we’ve previously promoted Hongliang Yan’s book, Heritage Tourism in China, in conjunction with World Heritage Day. Facebook is also the main place where we post photos of office goings on, so your book may well end up in a photo like the one above of our commissioning editors with their books published in January. If you have any ideas for a relevant photo opportunity for your book, just let us know and we’ll see what we can do!

Twitter is a great place to get book news out to the right people, and we do try to “mention” relevant accounts with publication news where we can. If you have any ideas about popular hashtags used by the community you’re trying to reach or users who would be especially interested in your work, let us know on your AQ and we’ll include them in our marketing plans. Each of our books are assigned three or four tweets during the month following its publication giving a taster of what to expect from the book, and we also announce it on both Twitter and Facebook on publication day. By using relevant hashtags, the word about a new book gets out to people who might not have heard about it otherwise, and we often see people mentioning friends or colleagues with recommendations of our books.

We ask all our authors to write a piece about their book for our blog, which we schedule to coincide with its publication. This is a really good way to publicise the book and provide interested readers with a “behind the scenes” insight into how the book came about, giving authors a chance to sell their book beyond the blurb on our website. If you can send us photos or even videos to include in the post to grab readers’ attention, even better! We always announce new blog posts on Facebook and Twitter ourselves, but again, the braver authors are about sharing their post and telling the world about their work, the greater the number of views and the more engagement we see.

One of the videos to accompany Optimizing Language Learners’ Nonverbal Behavior

For those authors that are feeling especially creative, we also have a YouTube channel where we post videos authors have produced to accompany their book. For example, we recently posted a video by Wayne E. Wright and Colin Baker where they spoke about the latest edition of Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism and one by Janet Enever and Eva Lindgren introducing their new book Early Language Learning. For their book, Optimizing Language Learners’ Nonverbal Behavior Tammy Gregersen and Peter MacIntyre produced a series of accompanying videos, such as “Say it with your Hands!”, all of which can be accessed on our YouTube channel. If you’d like to do something similar for the publication of your own book, just get in touch with us to discuss your ideas.

Nowadays social media is an invaluable tool for getting publication news out there, and we do our best to publicise your book as much as possible, but there’s no doubt that the more active the author is in promoting their book through their own channels, the better. So get Facebooking/Tweeting/Blogging/YouTubing!

Follow us on Twitter: @Multi_Ling_Mat / @Channel_View

Like our Facebook page: Multilingual Matters / Channel View Publications

Check out our YouTube channel


Why publish with us?

15 December 2015

With academic publishing becoming more competitive, we need to fight to keep our place among the larger publishers. We are proud of our independent status and of the values that we represent. This post gives a bit more detail about why authors should choose Multilingual Matters/Channel View Publications as their publisher.

The MM/CV team

The MM/CV team

We are a small, independent company wholly owned by our Managing Director, Tommi Grover, his brother Sami and the staff who work for Multilingual Matters/Channel View Publications. This means our publishing decisions are made by and for people with a knowledge of, and passion for, languages, multilingualism and tourism studies. We are free to publish books we believe in and to treat our authors, customers and staff with integrity, as ultimately we answer to people who care about the areas we publish in, rather than to people who are uninvolved in the day-to-day running of the company and are more concerned with profits.

Publishing with us is a positive choice to support an independent, ethical company, and a responsive, compassionate way of doing business. Publishing with us doesn’t mean you can expect ‘less’ than from a bigger publisher – in fact we’d suggest you should expect more from us:

  • Because our staff feel valued and cared for, they stay for a long time. So it’s highly likely you will deal with the same person from proposal to publication and beyond. All 7 of us are involved in the decision to publish every book, and so whoever you speak to will know about you, your book, and why it’s important.
  • We travel a lot (and we were off-setting our carbon footprint before it was fashionable). This means your books will be seen by people all over the world, and that our staff are at specialist conferences where they meet new authors and customers. In the past year our team of 7 has been to: New Zealand, Japan, the US (lots of times), Canada, France, Poland, Australia, Sweden, Lapland, Germany, Italy and several UK conferences (and this has been a quiet year on the conference front!).
  • We offer open access publishing; everything we publish is available as consumer ebooks; and we continue to publish as much as we can as affordable paperbacks.
  • We are proud of the help and support we offer authors publishing their first book: we have been doing this for years, and we do it because we believe in developing new talent and new ideas, not because we need manuscripts to pad out our publication program. Our first-time authors receive the same care and attention as their more experienced colleagues.
  • We are constantly looking out for new topics and ideas and we are pleased to be often the first publisher to take a risk in a new and emerging subject area.

We hope that you find this useful. If you would like further information about sending us a proposal please see the proposal guidelines on our website.

If you are still working on your PhD but think that you would like to rework it for a book then please see our notes on turning your PhD thesis into a book.


A-Z of Publishing: X is for…

26 October 2015

X is for Xuesong (Andy) GaoX is for Xuesong (Andy) Gao. Xuesong (Andy) Gao is one of our authors. He is based at the University of Hong Kong and is one of our many overseas authors. We support academics working in countries all over the world and have authors living in countries from Fiji to Hawaii! Out of the 84 authors who published books with us in 2014 only 21 are based at UK institutions, and that’s not including the numerous chapter authors who also published with us. We consider ourselves to be a truly international publisher!

This post is part of our ‘A-Z of Publishing’ series which we will be posting every Monday throughout the rest of 2015. You can search the blog for the rest of the series or subscribe to the blog to receive an email as soon as the next post is published by using the links on the right of the page.


A-Z of Publishing: V is for…

12 October 2015

V is for VisitorsV is for Visitors. We love having visitors pop into our office in Bristol and are always happy to put the kettle on to have a cup of tea with an author or contact. We have even had manuscripts hand-delivered in the past, so if you’re ever planning to be in Bristol do let us know!

This post is part of our ‘A-Z of Publishing’ series which we will be posting every Monday throughout the rest of 2015. You can search the blog for the rest of the series or subscribe to the blog to receive an email as soon as the next post is published by using the links on the right of the page.


From Word file to printer’s file: Copy-editing, typesetting, proofreading

20 May 2015

There are many people who are part of the publication process other than the Channel View team themselves. Ralph Footring is one of these, providing key copyediting, typesetting and proofreading services for many of our books. In this post, he explains what his job involves and why his services are so important.

I am one of Channel View Publications’ suppliers. I take an author’s Word file for a book and give the publisher a file to hand over to the printer. In between, there is the copy-editing, dealing with author queries, setting up the book’s fonts and page layout, typesetting, sending out proofs, taking in corrections and doing some final checks.

Ralph at work

Ralph at work

Why not just send the author’s Word file to the printer? It can be done and is much cheaper, but it is difficult to get good-looking pages out of Word. Most authors set their files up for A4, which isn’t a good size for a book. And authors do make mistakes – spelling, grammar and some of a more general nature (the name of the guitarist and songwriter for The Who is Pete Townshend, with an ‘h’). I once worked for a publisher who used authors’ print-outs to produce short-run books that wouldn’t have been published at all otherwise. At first, they didn’t trouble to have anyone read through the typescript, but then they produced one too many books with a missing page. Once someone is turning over the pages to make sure they are all there, they might as well look to see if a diagram is there if one is referred to in the text. And does that diagram show what the text says it shows? And then you are slipping into copy-editing.

Needless to say, I think copy-editing is a vital part of the publishing process.

A couple of recent books that Ralph has worked on.

A couple of recent books that Ralph has worked on.

That sentence might set my stall out. Do I delete ‘Needless to say’ (it isn’t needless to say it) or the whole sentence (because it is needless)? But if it’s not my own text, what am I doing interfering with it all? And what about ‘set my stall out’? If a book is intended for a readership that will likely include a lot of people whose first language is not English, there would be a good argument to avoid such idioms, and it might be better phrased as ‘make my position clear’. And what about beginning a sentence with ‘And’? Perhaps with spelling we are on safer ground, but that leads on to a question of consistency. It seems undeniably better not to mix -ize spellings and -ise spellings (sometimes ‘recognize’, sometimes ‘recognise’), but what about ‘though’ and ‘although’? Is it really only cramping an author’s style to insist that only one is used throughout a text?  Most authors seem grateful to have someone read their work carefully, to check that the references are all there and that they haven’t made spelling mistakes and grammatical slips, and perhaps that what they have written makes sense, if it’s done respectfully and without undue interference.

Larger publishers tend to have rather rigid production processes, and it is hard to cross the boundaries between the editorial department (copy-editing) and the production department (design, typesetting, proofs). I like working for smaller publishers like Channel View Publications who can look at each book as an individual project.

My production process usually looks like this: copy-edit in Word, with ‘track changes’ on and author queries raised in ‘comment’ notes; send file to author for review of copy-editing and to answer queries; get file back from author, make any further changes (in response to queries and so on) and tidy it up; import the text file into the typesetting software (Adobe’s InDesign is pretty much the industry standard); place the text onto the page template and assign all the correct styles (chapter heading, sub-head, sub-sub-head, body text, and so on); produce proofs; take in corrections; produce the ‘press ready’ pdf file for the printer. The job satisfaction is in seeing it through from beginning to end. After many years, I still get a thrill opening a new book and thinking I’ve been part of the process.

For more information about Ralph and the services he offers please take a look at his website.


Turning a PhD into a book

12 May 2015

Here at Channel View Publications we’re very proud of our track record of publishing successful books based on PhD theses. Finding and developing young authors is central to what we do, and both we and our series editors are happy to work with authors who have recently finished their theses to turn their work into a book.

Unlike publishers who will republish PhD theses largely as they are (with no real expectation of them gaining an audience), we do ask our authors to do a significant amount of re-thinking and re-writing before we will publish their PhD research: we don’t believe it is in anyone’s interest to publish books which no-one buys or reads! Equally the work of early-career researchers is not just padding for our list, and so you can rest assured that if you do the work on your manuscript, we will match it by giving your book the time and attention it deserves.

Examples of recent Phd-to-book transitions

Examples of recent Phd-to-book transitions

When we discuss a proposal we always prefer to see that the author has understood the level of rewriting that will probably be needed before publication. So a good first step is to contact the commissioning editor or academic editor of the series you think your manuscript would be most suitable for, and discuss it with them. You might also find it useful to have a look at a few successful PhD-to-book transitions that we have published recently.

There are a few main things you’ll need to think about:

Audience You need to consider the change in your audience, and what they might be looking for in your text: PhD examiners and supervisors are looking for a demonstration that you understand how to do research, that you’ve read everything you need to, and that you can write up a piece of research diligently; book-buyers need to be drawn in and encouraged to make connections between your work on a community/topic that may be of no particular interest to them and their own interests.

Content Your readers should be familiar with the literature (or most of it!) and they’ll assume that you are too, so your literature review can be cut down considerably. Similarly, they’ll assume that you know how to conduct research, so you don’t need a long discussion of methodology, unless methodological concerns are particularly important. Do you need all those tables and appendices? Are they there to demonstrate that you haven’t missed anything, or will your readers find them enlightening?

Style and structure Could you start presenting your data right at the beginning of the book? It’s your new material that your readers are likely to be interested in, so give it to them! Can your work be restructured and ordered thematically rather than introduction-literature review-methodology-data-conclusion? Does your writing style need lightening to draw in the maximum possible audience?

When you’ve just defended your thesis and are more than ready to move on to something new, we understand that the idea of revisiting it can be off-putting, to say the least. But we’ll be there to support you every step of the way to publication and beyond…

You can find our proposal guidelines on our website.

Anna


The Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society

2 March 2012

We’ve been working with the Publishers Licensing Society (PLS) and the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS) for many years now, and we wanted to share a little bit about what the ALCS does for authors. We strongly encourage our authors to sign up as a member and register all of their books. The photocopying licence money belongs to the authors, and if they don’t claim it, the money will just go unclaimed!

The ALCS is a not-for-profit membership organisation which works to protect and promote authors’ rights. It represents the interests of authors and safeguards their intellectual property rights. ALCS collects money owed to authors for secondary uses of their work such as photocopying, scanning and digital copying. This income is from licences issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA), set up jointly by ALCS and the PLS to license reproduction rights on behalf of its member organisations. Institutions such as universities must pay a licence fee to be able to use the material in this way.

Authors should register all their books and any journal articles written in the last 3 years with ALCS so that they receive any money they may be due. Anyone who has written a book or journal article can join ALCS. ALCS now has over 80000 members, many of whom are academic authors. You can apply to join online at www.alcs.co.uk. Lifetime membership is £25 and this is deducted from the first payment so you don’t have to pay anything if the ALCS doesn’t collect any money for you.

The ALCS also campaigns on behalf of writers to ensure that they receive fair payment for the use of their work and to raise awareness of intellectual property and copyright.

To keep up-to-date with ALCS you can follow them on Twitter and Facebook.


Authors Around the World

22 November 2011

With Christmas on its way we’re busy writing, signing and posting cards in the office.  We sort the cards by mailing destination and, given that we’re a small UK based company, what’s striking is just how big our “Rest of the World” pile is.  We therefore thought it might be interesting to share the diverse geographical background of our authors with you.

It’s 10:15am here in Bristol and it’s a bright but cold autumnal Tuesday.  It’s funny to think that the day is just coming to an end for our author, David Harrison, in Fiji and is yet to dawn for Christina Higgins in Hawaii.  We’ve got authors as far north as Finland and Canada, as far south as the Western Cape, South Africa and Anne-Marie de Meija is right on the equator in Colombia.  I’ve had fun putting together this map which shows just a few of the locations mentioned above.

Just a few of our authors' locations

If you click on the map, you can enlarge it and zoom in to read the covers.

Aside from geographical details, it’s also good to see that every continent is represented and our authors certainly aren’t all based in developed English speaking countries.  In the past twelve months books, we’ve published books by academics based in Australia, Canada, the Ivory Coast, France, Japan, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Belgium, Mozambique, Poland, Ireland, UK, Spain, Denmark, Switzerland, USA, China, Italy and Sweden.  Phew!  And that’s just a sample of the last 12 months; the list of countries is very long, and growing.

We also work hard to ensure that our books are available for anyone to buy, wherever in the world they are.  We have reps working across Asia and regularly agree low price reprints for our titles with publishers in countries such as India. We also sell lots of translation rights, the most recent sale being “Rural Tourism and Sustainable Business” sold for translation into Macedonian and Albanian.  Wherever you are based, and whether you’re an author, customer or publisher with a project in mind or question to ask, please do get in touch, we love hearing from you.

Laura


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