Language, Immigration and Naturalization

This month we are publishing Language, Immigration and Naturalization edited by Ariel Loring and Vaidehi Ramanathan. In this post, Ariel introduces the main themes of the book

Language, Immigration and NaturalizationLanguage, immigration, and naturalization – the title of this book in fact – are three topics with a steady influence across both time and space. Historically, language policies and ideologies have affected, and continue to affect, immigration and naturalization laws, immigration quotas, citizenship tests and nationalistic discourse. Geographically, recent world events have ignited impassioned disagreements concerning im(migration) and national borders. Prior research on citizenship has been embedded in numerous fields of inquiry (including applied linguistics, sociology, education, legal studies and policy studies) and often views “citizenship” through its legal definition of “rights and responsibilities.” What characterizes this volume is its holistic consideration of citizenship in terms of access, participation, engagement and culture.

Our edited volume not only considers the everyday legalities of naturalization but also broader identity and sociopolitical concerns. Its chapters are organized into three subsections – Policies, Pedagogies and Discourses – and includes discussions about:

  • The means by which a particular country accepts naturalized citizens
  • The language of citizenship tests and classes
  • The labeling of who is or isn’t a “citizen” or “member” of society
  • The lived experiences of immigrants in bordered areas
  • The depictions of citizenship and immigration in media discourse

The authors pursue these topics from various research backgrounds and in different areas of the world. Collectively, they explore the experiences of immigrants/outsiders as they make a life in their adopted/native country. In addressing these issues, the following three questions come to light:

  • What does the process of becoming a citizen look like?
  • In what ways are people excluded from full participation?
  • How does language position and frame insiders and outsiders?

We, the editors, are drawn to this research because of the universality of immigration and naturalization issues and the debates and policies that ensue. We realize that even those who live far from a national border are still exposed to political language that dehumanizes migrants and fears differences. And those who themselves are descendants of immigrants are able to rationalize the exclusion of new immigrants. As ramifications of citizenship and naturalization are infused in everyday meaning-making and constructions of identity, this volume brings a needed critical and linguistic lens to these topics.

Ariel Loring, University of California, Davis and California State University, Sacramento, USA
afloring@ucdavis.edu

Refugee Resettlement in the United StatesFor more information about this book please see our website or contact the Ariel Loring at the address above. If you found this interesting, you might also like Refugee Resettlement in the United States edited by Emily M. Feuerherm and Vaidehi Ramanathan.

Our latest books on Indigenous Education

The Education of Indigenous Citizens in Latin AmericaLast month we published The Education of Indigenous Citizens in Latin America edited by Regina Cortina. This book examines the development of intercultural bilingual education throughout Latin America. It assesses the challenges of implementing this educational practice in places where Indigenous peoples have struggled to preserve their cultural practices in the face of colonialism and forced assimilation.

Judy Kalman from Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del IPN in Mexico City calls the book “A must-read for scholars, students, and others interested in issues of social justice.” The book features the voices of practitioners from the region, including Indigenous scholars, policy makers and educators.

A year ago we published Teresa L. McCarty’s book Language Planning and Policy in Native America which explored language education for the Indigenous people of Native America. The book examines similar themes to that of Cortina’s in that it looks at the imposition of colonial language policies which challenge community-driven efforts to revitalize threatened mother tongues.

Tiffany S. Lee from the University of New Mexico calls McCarty’s work “an insightful, thoroughly investigated, and critical examination of the complexities of Native American language rights and change.”

Youth Culture, Language Endangerment and Linguistic SurvivanceRevitalising Indigenous LanguagesIf you are interested in these topics you might also like some of our other titles such as Youth Culture, Language Endangerment and Linguistic Survivance by Leisy Thornton Wyman and Revitalising Indigenous Languages by Marja-Liisa Olthuis, Suvi Kivelä and Tove Skutnabb-Kangas.