Summer in the Channel View Office

It’s been an eventful summer here in the Channel View office what with the Olympics, summer holidays, several birthdays as well as a 10 year anniversary and another still to come! Although we’re still mourning the end of the Olympics we can distract ourselves with the busy conference season. ahead of us.

Next week Tommi and I are heading to the Freie Universität in Berlin for the Sociolinguistics Symposium where we will see many of our authors. This year’s theme is Language and the city and there are sure to be plenty of interesting papers being presented. We will be displaying all our new and recent books and they will be for sale at a bargain price of €20.

September is also jam-packed with conferences, starting with EUROSLA and BAAL at the beginning of the month. Laura will be heading to EUROSLA at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland where the conference theme is Expanding discipline boundaries. We’re pleased to see that one of our authors Jean-Marc Dewaele will be a plenary speaker at the conference and Laura will look forward to catching up with him, our other authors and new faces while she’s there. Please come and visit our stand if you’re going to be at EUROSLA and take a look at our books on display.

Meanwhile I will be heading down to Southampton for BAAL where our author Aneta Pavlenko will be a plenary speaker. Again, I will be looking forward to seeing a lot of familiar faces and meeting new people too. This year’s theme is Multilingual Theory and Practice in Applied Linguistics and there seems to be a really interesting programme.

Later in the month Sarah is heading to Bournemouth for the Tourism, Climate Change and Sustainability conference. Channel View author Richard Butler will be a keynote speaker here and the conference covers all aspects of climate change, sustainable tourism, ecotourism and green issues as well as disaster management.

While Sarah heads to the seaside in Bournemouth, Tommi will be travelling overseas to Castelló in Spain for the Eighth International Conference on Third Language Acquisition and Multilingualism (L3) conference where several of the keynote speakers are Multilingual Matters authors.

But if you’re worried that we spend our whole time travelling and won’t be in the office when you need us then don’t panic! You can always reach us by email when we’re away at conferences and there should always be someone in the office to take your call if you have an urgent query.

Our contact details: info@multilingual-matters.com and +44 (0)117 3158562

Auckland antics

I’m just back in the office after my trip to New Zealand for the Task-Based Language Teaching and Language, Education and Diversity conferences in Auckland. I’d never been to the southern hemisphere before let alone New Zealand and was looking forward to escaping the British winter for a few weeks.

View from my hotel

I arrived in Auckland to beautiful sunshine and the view from my hotel was pretty amazing. Auckland is New Zealand’s largest city and is home to 31% of the country’s population. It is a really fascinating place situated between the Hauraki Gulf of the Pacific Ocean and the Tasman Sea and surrounded by volcanoes.

Having managed to avoid jetlag completely, I set up our stand at the first conference on Task-Based Language Teaching. The conference was a success and I sold plenty of books and met a lot of friendly people.

Once the first conference was finished it was straight onto the next one. A lot of our authors were at the Language, Education and Diversity conference and it was great to see so many familiar faces. Jan Blommaert, Joseph Lo Bianco and Angel Lin were all keynote speakers and many of our other authors were presenting papers throughout the conference. People were so interested in our books that I managed to sell every single copy I’d brought with me which was great!

Maori entertainment

We sponsored the welcome reception which took place in the Fale Pasifika at the university. The Fale is a symbol of identity for Pacific Island students and staff. The Fale provides a home for ceremonies, a place for teaching and learning about the Pacific Islands, and is the second largest such structure in the world. We were entertained with traditional Maori music and dancing which was great fun especially when they got the delegates up to dance too.

The conference dinner was across the harbour on the opposite shore. Unfortunately the planned ferry ride over was cancelled due to bad weather but the view was amazing as we were right on the water with a view over towards the city. The food was delicious and included fresh local seafood as well as many other Kiwi delicacies such as pavlova.

View of Auckland from across the harbour

Once the conferences were over I was able to have a few days of holiday exploring more of New Zealand and I managed to travel around some of the North Island. New Zealand is such a beautiful place and I would love to go back and travel around the rest of the country. So I’m now keeping an eye out for another New Zealand conference that is absolutely vital for us to attend so I can go back!

Elinor

A Year at Channel View Publications

Today marks my first anniversary of joining the Channel View team. It’s not a big milestone yet (Anna and Sarah are inching their way towards an impressive decade with the company), but I thought it might be interesting to share with you a bit of what I’ve done this past year.

Having already spent 2 months on work experience here the summer before, there were no real surprises when I returned to the office, and it was good to hear about what everyone and the company had been up to in the past year. Part of what I do involves dealing with inspection copy requests, book orders, stock checks and queries in general, all of which I’d done before, so it was straight back into the swing of things for me. It was, however, a real test for me to dredge information on how to do things back up from the bottom of my brain: when I left after my work experience I never thought I’d see another of our books again, let alone be working with them!

Much of my time is spent doing marketing tasks for Elinor, such as informing wholesalers of our new titles; producing fliers and adverts and sending materials to conferences, and helping Sarah a bit with production, my favourite job being working with our designers to produce book covers. I also put books into production, so January was an exciting month as the first books that I’d worked on were published.

One of the things my friends are most envious about when I tell them about my job is certainly the travel to conferences. I feel very lucky to have already been to memorable conferences in Leeds (IALIC), New Orleans (TESOL) and Chicago (AAAL) and to have EUROSLA in Stockholm and the Frankfurt Book Fair coming up. As the vast majority of our work is done over email I love having these opportunities to meet our authors and customers and put a face to a name, as well as visiting new places.

Plant flourishing on my desk

Apart from my usual jobs, there’s often something out of the ordinary to do, be it meeting a wholesaler’s incredible warehouse robot; making our twitter-o-meter wall chart to track our ever increasing follower numbers or just tending to the office plants, one job I’m perhaps not so good at! My first year at Channel View has certainly been far from dull!

Laura

A snapshot of life in the Channel View marketing department


The marketing manager hard at work

As marketing manager it is my job to promote our titles to booksellers, libraries and individual academics with a helping hand from Laura, our publishing assistant. We work hard to ensure major booksellers and wholesalers worldwide are kept up-to-date with our latest publications.

Each book receives individual attention from our marketing department and is strongly promoted at relevant conferences. We view promotion of our books as a partnership between the author and ourselves and we regularly receive compliments from appreciative authors on our friendly and accessible approach. We are proactive in placing review copies with relevant journals and coordinating targeted direct mail campaigns to academics, faculty, professionals, bookshops and librarians.

The marketing process begins when a book is accepted for production around 6 months before publication. At this point we create an advanced information sheet (AI) for the book. This is then mailed out to booksellers as well as our reps and agents. We also encourage authors to use their own personal contacts and social networks for promoting their books as this is a really effective way of reaching the market.

Now that social media has become an integral part of our lives (well for some of us, anyway!) the way we market our books has changed. Whereas a decade or so ago we sent out all our bibliographic information by mail, we now tweet our latest book news.

However, although email and online marketing is increasingly important we still produce and send out hard copy catalogues as we still find this a valuable marketing tool. These are sent out to major customers and key academics and are also displayed at conferences and bookfairs.

We can be found at most major conferences in the field. Our travel schedule is a vital part of our marketing strategy, ensuring that our publications reach their target audience. Our active presence at most key events also allows us to keep informed of the latest developments in the field and to target our commissioning, product development and marketing towards the topics and issues that matter most. Conferences are one of the few places that our customers can browse a wide range of our books.

Once a book is published we send out copies to the authors as well as key individuals who are likely to influence sales of the book.  We publicise the book on relevant email lists or listservs as well as on Twitter, our own email newsletters and on our blog.

We enjoy working with our authors to market their books but always welcome any ideas and suggestions so if you’d like to comment on anything we do just get in touch.

Elinor Robertson
Elinor@channelviewpublications.com

Summertime at Channel View

It’s finally summertime here and we’re all trying to make the most of the rare days of sunshine! The summer can be a quiet time for academic publishers as many researchers are on holiday or making the most of the vacation and not having to teach their students. However, the Channel View team will be busy beavering away (inbetween our own holidays of course!) and getting ready for the start of the new academic year. We will be preparing our new catalogues as well as making arrangements for forthcoming conferences.

In August Tommi is attending the 16th World Congress of Applied Linguistics (AILA) in Beijing. China is a really big market for us and as AILA is an important conference it is essential that we attend. While he is there Tommi will be meeting with our Chinese rep to discuss our strategy for the Chinese market. He will report back on how the conference goes later in the summer.

Meanwhile, we have three important European conferences to prepare for in September. Firstly, there’s the British Association of Applied Linguistics (BAAL) conference. This year it’s just down the road at the University of the West of England so we don’t need to travel far to get there! Next is the 21st Annual Conference of the European Second Language Association (EUROSLA) which is in Stockholm, Sweden this year. Our publishing assistant Laura will be staffing our stand at EUROSLA so do go and see her and take a look at our new books. When Tommi has recovered from his trip to China he will be heading to the Seventh International Conference on Third Language Acquisition and Multilingualism (L3) which this year will be in Warsaw, Poland. We sponsor the Best Student Paper Prize at the L3 conference so the winner will be awarded their choice of €100 of Multilingual Matters books. That takes us up to the end of September and after that we will be preparing for the Frankfurt Book Fair.

So that’s what we’ll be doing for the next couple of months. Also, with 4 out of 5 of the Channel View team having their birthdays in August, we generally end up eating an awful lot of birthday cake throughout the summer!