The Great Potential of Arab Tourism Destinations

23 June 2017

This month we published Tourism in the Arab World edited by Hamed Almuhrzi, Hafidh Alriyami and Noel Scott. In this post Hamed explains the inspiration behind the book and outlines its main themes.

The socioeconomic changes in a number of emerging economies, including Arab countries, have enabled many people from these countries to travel. In 2015, The United Nations World Tourism Organization reported that in 2014 this region was among the fastest growing regions in terms of travel total contribution to GDP (gross domestic product). Arab tourism destinations and markets hold great potential for the tourism business; however, it appears that we know little about them.

When I started my PhD study, one of the difficulties I faced was finding literature that discussed aspects of the tourism industry within Arab countries. There was a clear scarcity in research on planning, management and marketing of Arab destinations, or on understanding Arab tourists’ behaviours and dispositions. Through conversations with colleagues, it became clear that there is a need to establish and promote a dialogue on issues that concern the Arab tourism industry and bring tourism-related discussion to the attention of international tourism literature.

The existing tourism literature seems to be confused on many issues when it comes to discussing Arab tourism phenomena. Tourism in the Arab World introduces tourism researchers to such issues. Questions such as ‘What is the Arab World?’, or ‘Who is an Arab?’ are discussed and we address how this has further implications for tourism studies. In addition, the image of Arab destinations has been associated with various risk perceptions within international tourism literature – mainly the political crisis that many Arab destinations have been witnessing and the way they have been portrayed through the international media. This volume highlights this issue and provides recommendations for dealing with it for tourism marketing organisations and tourism researchers/practitioners. It also discusses whether the generalisation of risk perceptions is justified.

From an outsider’s perspective, Arab countries seem to be perceived similarly. However, various chapters within this volume emphasise that it is important to be careful of putting all Arab destinations in the same basket when it comes to issues such as tourism development, planning or structure of the industry. It was apparent throughout the discussion that Arab tourism destinations vary in their approaches. The discussion has pinpointed several concerns that tourism researchers and practitioners need to be aware of, such as the impact of Islam, culture and the political structure of each destination, and how these factors contribute to the development of tourism in each country.

While the book tries to stimulate discussion on various tourism issues that concern Arab destinations and market, it focuses more on business aspects of the tourism industry. Hence, there are four overall themes covered in this volume:

  • Tourism policy, organisation and planning
  • Tourism product development
  • Destination marketing
  • Arab consumer behaviour

Throughout these themes, tourism researchers and practitioners can appreciate differences and complications when it comes to dealing with emerging Arab tourism destinations, which in return provide more thoughts for discussion.

For more information about this book, please see our website. If you found this interesting, you might also like Tourism in the Middle East edited by Rami Farouk Daher.


CAUTHE 2014, Brisbane, 10-13 February

4 March 2014
Story Bridge

Story Bridge

It was the University of Queensland’s turn to host CAUTHE this year and the conference was held in the Sofitel in Brisbane – with a lovely view for us exhibitors of Anzac Square. Noel Scott and his team of volunteers did a great job of organising especially as there were more delegates this year! 

As usual, it was a successful trip for Channel View and a great chance to catch up with a lot of our authors and meet new people.

UQ's YMCA

UQ’s YMCA

There were some thought-provoking keynotes from Stefan Gössling and Ulrike Gretzel and the Great Debate was won by the Aussies this year – in keeping with general sporting results!

UQ arranged for the conference cocktail reception to be held at the Customs House situated on Eagle St Pier, which was a lovely venue with great views of the Story Bridge – designed by the same man who designed the Sydney Harbour Bridge (fun fact!)

The conference finished with a great evening of dinner and dancing – made even better by an awesome YMCA performance from the UQ staff!

 

The Gabbatoir

The Gabbatoir

After the conference I went to watch some cricket at the GABBA – though haunted by the Ashes memories…

We’re looking forward to next year’s CAUTHE which will be hosted by Southern Cross University.

Sarah


Critical Debates in Tourism

15 August 2012

Today marks the publication of Critical Debates in Tourism edited by Tej Vir Singh which is a comprehensive volume encompassing the key issues in tourism research. Tej Vir Singh is the founding Director of the Centre for Tourism Research and Development in Lucknow, India and established the Centre’s international journal Tourism Recreation Research.

This new volume brings together the key researchers in the field and provides a multidisciplinary examination of the fundamental debates of tourism studies. It covers topics ranging from the relevance of mass tourism, voluntourism, slow tourism, the impact of climate change, the dilemma of authenticity as well as tourism ethics. This book is unique in its format and will be an essential resource for tourism scholars and practitioners.

Noel Scott from the University of Queensland calls it: “A must for those wanting to get to grips with the key tourism debates” and John Tribe from the University of Surrey describes the volume as ” a fascinating book…highly recommended.”

Critical Debates in Tourism is part of our Aspects of Tourism series which aims to provide readers with the latest thinking on tourism world-wide and to push back the frontiers of tourism knowledge. For more information on this series or to discuss ideas for a proposal please contact the commissioning editor Elinor Robertson.

Lecturers who are considering using the book for the courses they’re teaching can order an inspection copy of the book by clicking here.

For further information on this title or any other books on tourism studies please see our website.


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