Sport Heritage Stories from the CVP Team

This month we are publishing Heritage and Sport by Gregory Ramshaw. In this post, some of the CVP team tell tales of their own sport heritage.

Sarah

My parents met at a hockey match in which they squared off against each other (my mum was a kickass goalie) so I have always felt that sport is important in relation to my own heritage!

Aside from that, my sister and I were brought up constantly watching football and cricket; our mum is a fervent and dedicated Man Utd and England cricket fan. We were treated to replays of the 1981 and 1986/7 Ashes series at a young age (the latter of which Daddles the Duck was an exciting feature) and a subconscious impression that Australians-when-playing-cricket should not be liked – cue deep disapproval when we pretended to be the Waugh twins while playing in the garden.

My dad is still playing hockey at 75 – I hope I am as active at his age!

Tommi

I’ve always been fascinated by Finland’s heritage in long-distance running and other Nordic endurance sports. In particular the exploits of Paavo Nurmi, Ville Ritola, Hannes Kolehmainen and the other “flying Finns” has always been of interest, all the way up to Lasse Viren who famously fell during the 10,000m at the 1972 Munich Olympics, picked himself calmly up, chased down David Bedford to not just win the gold medal but also break the world record in the process. Although I haven’t visited many historic sites, the one place I did feel worth a visit was the Eläintarha athletics track in Helsinki, where on June 19th 1924 Paavo Nurmi tested whether it would be possible to run both 1500m and 5000m races in the same hour, since this was going to be the schedule at the Olympics that year. He set new world records for both distances…. Finnish long-distance running has had a glorious past, and as a child I dreamed of matching the exploits of these incredible athletes. Although I have lately conceded that I probably will never run at the Olympics, or break many world records, I do still feel a sense of pride whenever reminded of these events.

Laura

I’ve often found myself by chance or intention at the sites of previous Olympic Games. I find it fascinating to see how some sites have been put to good use and regenerated into something benefiting the local area, while others have become slightly eerie abandoned shells of their former glories. Here I am with some friends at the Olympic Rings in Portland, Dorset, which is where the sailing events were held during the London 2012 Olympics. It was a very cold and blustery day…perfect sailing conditions!

 

 

For more information about Heritage and Sport please see our website.

Getting to know the Channel View team: Sarah

Sarah is our Production Manager and has been with the company for well over a decade. She is in charge of producing all our new books; this means that every author who publishes with us works together with Sarah at some point during the publication of their work, that’s quite a claim! People who work with Sarah may have noticed that she’s an early bird and is often the first into the office in the morning and busy replying to emails even before the rest of us are out of bed! In this post we’ll be getting to know our early riser better!

Aside from the lure of the office(!), is it the thought of breakfast, coffee or the sports news that will get you up early in the morning?

Definitely breakfast – cereal is always exciting (Frosties are currently my cereal of choice). I do love my Sky Sports News morning bulletin but it’s very dependent on the previous day’s results as to whether it gets me out of bed early!

Sarah at Wembley
Sarah at Wembley

Yum, I’m a cereal person too! So, are there any sports or clubs in particular that you listen out for on the sports news?

Huge football fan – Manchester United and Bristol City. United not playing amazingly well this season (or last!) but after 20-odd years of success I can’t really complain. At least Bristol City got promoted last season which is very exciting as the stadium is about 10 mins from my house so I was able to hear a lot of distant cheering last winter! I also love cricket but following England can be a bit of a downer – at least we can beat Scotland!

Yes, as a sports fan I guess you have to deal with mixed successes! You must have been to lots of sports grounds in the UK, but have you been to any stadia abroad, any particular highlight?

I’ve been to watch cricket in a few different places – Australia, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, South Africa. Think my favourite ground has to be the MCG in Melbourne – just so big and a great atmosphere! But Newlands in Cape Town was pretty amazing too with the backdrop of Table Mountain. I’ve also been to Yankee Stadium in NY and saw the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park in September.

Wow, you really are a well-travelled sports fan! When you’re not spectating sports, do you also like to play them, or what are your other favourite ways to spend your free time?

I’ve been playing ladies cricket for past few summers which I’m really enjoying – last summer I played for a men’s team which was a little scary but also a lot of fun – managed to get a few wickets and catches! Apart from doing the Bristol 10k every year with my lovely colleagues I have to confess to being a bit of a recliner-in-front-of-the-tv slob!

Good for you – show the men how it’s done! There’s nothing wrong with an evening in front of the television. Aside from watching sports (!), are there any programmes or series that you rate as “not to be missed”?

So true. I am a sappily huge fan of Downton Abbey – Scandal, Supernatural and Parks & Recreation among my other faves! I also have a cross-trainer next to my TV which I sometimes gaze at in contemplation of future exercise. One day it will happen.

Nice selection. Ok, now it’s time for the curveball final question! If you could have a super power, what would it be and why?!

Hmm, I’d have to go for super speed like The Flash – you could get all your work and household chores done in no time!

Good choice, I love that idea! Just a few more questions and then you’re done:

Ice cream or yogurt? Ice cream – always go for the unhealthy option!

Mountains or beach? Beach! I come from a seaside town so it has to be beach every time.

BBQ or picnic? Hmm, as I usually spend at least a couple of weeks in Australia every year I’ll have to go for the barbie option!! And they smell good.

Comedy or drama? This is tricky, probably lean more towards comedy in general.

Football or cricket? So tough! Football just shades it – I think I like cricket better in the cricket season but I know I love football the best when it returns!!

Facebook or Twitter? I have different answers for these depending on what kind of mood I’m in! Currently it would have to be Facebook.

Thanks Sarah. There’s still a few more posts about the team to come so keep an eye out for them!

Summer and Sport

Just published this week in time for England’s latest test match, Tourism and Cricket edited by Tom Baum and Richard Butler is the first book to focus on the relationship between tourism and cricket. Here, Richard Butler explains a bit about the unique nature of cricket tourism. 

Football and rugby notwithstanding, it is summer which is really the sporting season, and nothing epitomises summer in England more than cricket. As in the United States with baseball, summer afternoons and evenings seem highly suited to the crack of a bat on a ball. There are marked similarities between baseball and cricket, both involve bat and ball, both are team sports, and yet both essentially come down to one man with a ball throwing it at one man with a bat. The other players are secondary to the personal competition between two individuals.  Both sports have contributed to the language of their respective host countries, cricket via more than twenty phrases at the last count (including “a sticky wicket” and “stumped”, as well as the summation of the spirit of the game in “It’s not cricket”) and baseball has made it into the lexicon of English clichés with “stepping up to the plate” and “striking out” at least.

Tourism and CricketWhere these summer iconic activities differ most however, is in the duration and frequency of play and the travel patterns of their supporters. While most first class cricket teams play in the region of forty games a season, including county championship, limited over and Twenty20 formats, major league baseball teams play one hundred and sixty two games in a season and up to an additional twenty one in the misnamed “World Series” should they make the playoffs. It is unlikely any baseball fan watches live all the games his or her team plays in a season,  as attendance would require massive travelling across North America with great frequency, even allowing for the fact that some days see two games played between the same teams.

In the case of cricket however, such devotion to a team is possible and the distance and frequency of travel would be much less. In the case of national teams however, patriotic cricket fans become true international tourists compared to their American counterparts, whose international experience would be mostly non-existent as baseball is only played in a very few countries with no real international competition. Thus cricket encourages tourism on a considerable scale, if not in vast numbers, certainly in terms of per capita distance covered and time involved. The travels of the “Barmy Army” as the English supporters’ association is known sees some of its members travelling  half way round the world for several weeks to support their team in test matches in Australia and New Zealand in particular. As well, it is  not just the players and spectators who travel, because, as Michael Atherton recently pointed out there are at least as many backroom staff as players.

The links between cricket and tourism are explored in our new book just published by Channel View, Tourism and Cricket: Travels to the Boundary. The book examines the origins of international cricket, issues relating to the grounds, the travails and travels of both participants and fans, and the influence of cricket on the attitudes and behaviours of the supporters.

Sport Tourism DevelopmentFor more information about this book, please see our website. If you found this interesting, you might also like Sport Tourism Development by Tom Hinch and James Higham.