CVP/MM Summer Holiday Roundup

5 October 2017

The nights are drawing in and autumn has officially arrived, but before we say goodbye to summer altogether, here’s a look back at what the CVP/MM team each got up to on their summer holidays…

Tommi

I spent a month in Finland and spent most of that time offline, especially wonderful in places like this where I could be on my own and not even see other hikers, and enjoy the quiet and the mysterious sounds of nature…

 

Laura

This photo was taken late in the evening in Spain, when it was still over 30 degrees. By day we found it too hot to do anything but swim and read – a perfect way to spend a week and I came back feeling completely relaxed!

 

Sarah

I return to my hometown of Dawlish every year for carnival week and during a walk this year I found the perfect road name nearby! Sadly I think houses on this road might be out of my price range!

 

Alice

This summer I’ve been making the most of the ‘glorious’ British weather by heading out on a number of camping trips. My favourite one involved borrowing a campervan and driving down to Megavissey in Cornwall, where I swam in the sea and ate lots of pasties!

 

Anna

Here’s a photo of me bodyboarding with my elder daughter Alys in the (very cold) sea in Pembrokeshire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flo

I went to Lisbon for my holiday this year, where I spent most of my time exploring the narrow streets of the historic quarter and eating Portuguese custard tarts. Here’s a picture of me taken just before sunset at the Castelo de São Jorge, which sits on top of a hill and offers one of the best views of the city.


Summer and Sport

7 August 2014

Just published this week in time for England’s latest test match, Tourism and Cricket edited by Tom Baum and Richard Butler is the first book to focus on the relationship between tourism and cricket. Here, Richard Butler explains a bit about the unique nature of cricket tourism. 

Football and rugby notwithstanding, it is summer which is really the sporting season, and nothing epitomises summer in England more than cricket. As in the United States with baseball, summer afternoons and evenings seem highly suited to the crack of a bat on a ball. There are marked similarities between baseball and cricket, both involve bat and ball, both are team sports, and yet both essentially come down to one man with a ball throwing it at one man with a bat. The other players are secondary to the personal competition between two individuals.  Both sports have contributed to the language of their respective host countries, cricket via more than twenty phrases at the last count (including “a sticky wicket” and “stumped”, as well as the summation of the spirit of the game in “It’s not cricket”) and baseball has made it into the lexicon of English clichés with “stepping up to the plate” and “striking out” at least.

Tourism and CricketWhere these summer iconic activities differ most however, is in the duration and frequency of play and the travel patterns of their supporters. While most first class cricket teams play in the region of forty games a season, including county championship, limited over and Twenty20 formats, major league baseball teams play one hundred and sixty two games in a season and up to an additional twenty one in the misnamed “World Series” should they make the playoffs. It is unlikely any baseball fan watches live all the games his or her team plays in a season,  as attendance would require massive travelling across North America with great frequency, even allowing for the fact that some days see two games played between the same teams.

In the case of cricket however, such devotion to a team is possible and the distance and frequency of travel would be much less. In the case of national teams however, patriotic cricket fans become true international tourists compared to their American counterparts, whose international experience would be mostly non-existent as baseball is only played in a very few countries with no real international competition. Thus cricket encourages tourism on a considerable scale, if not in vast numbers, certainly in terms of per capita distance covered and time involved. The travels of the “Barmy Army” as the English supporters’ association is known sees some of its members travelling  half way round the world for several weeks to support their team in test matches in Australia and New Zealand in particular. As well, it is  not just the players and spectators who travel, because, as Michael Atherton recently pointed out there are at least as many backroom staff as players.

The links between cricket and tourism are explored in our new book just published by Channel View, Tourism and Cricket: Travels to the Boundary. The book examines the origins of international cricket, issues relating to the grounds, the travails and travels of both participants and fans, and the influence of cricket on the attitudes and behaviours of the supporters.

Sport Tourism DevelopmentFor more information about this book, please see our website. If you found this interesting, you might also like Sport Tourism Development by Tom Hinch and James Higham.


Office closed for the August bank holiday

23 August 2013

sunOur office is closed for the August bank holiday weekend and will reopen on Wednesday 28 August.


Summer in the Channel View Office

17 August 2012

It’s been an eventful summer here in the Channel View office what with the Olympics, summer holidays, several birthdays as well as a 10 year anniversary and another still to come! Although we’re still mourning the end of the Olympics we can distract ourselves with the busy conference season. ahead of us.

Next week Tommi and I are heading to the Freie Universität in Berlin for the Sociolinguistics Symposium where we will see many of our authors. This year’s theme is Language and the city and there are sure to be plenty of interesting papers being presented. We will be displaying all our new and recent books and they will be for sale at a bargain price of €20.

September is also jam-packed with conferences, starting with EUROSLA and BAAL at the beginning of the month. Laura will be heading to EUROSLA at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland where the conference theme is Expanding discipline boundaries. We’re pleased to see that one of our authors Jean-Marc Dewaele will be a plenary speaker at the conference and Laura will look forward to catching up with him, our other authors and new faces while she’s there. Please come and visit our stand if you’re going to be at EUROSLA and take a look at our books on display.

Meanwhile I will be heading down to Southampton for BAAL where our author Aneta Pavlenko will be a plenary speaker. Again, I will be looking forward to seeing a lot of familiar faces and meeting new people too. This year’s theme is Multilingual Theory and Practice in Applied Linguistics and there seems to be a really interesting programme.

Later in the month Sarah is heading to Bournemouth for the Tourism, Climate Change and Sustainability conference. Channel View author Richard Butler will be a keynote speaker here and the conference covers all aspects of climate change, sustainable tourism, ecotourism and green issues as well as disaster management.

While Sarah heads to the seaside in Bournemouth, Tommi will be travelling overseas to Castelló in Spain for the Eighth International Conference on Third Language Acquisition and Multilingualism (L3) conference where several of the keynote speakers are Multilingual Matters authors.

But if you’re worried that we spend our whole time travelling and won’t be in the office when you need us then don’t panic! You can always reach us by email when we’re away at conferences and there should always be someone in the office to take your call if you have an urgent query.

Our contact details: info@multilingual-matters.com and +44 (0)117 3158562


Summertime at Channel View

26 July 2011

It’s finally summertime here and we’re all trying to make the most of the rare days of sunshine! The summer can be a quiet time for academic publishers as many researchers are on holiday or making the most of the vacation and not having to teach their students. However, the Channel View team will be busy beavering away (inbetween our own holidays of course!) and getting ready for the start of the new academic year. We will be preparing our new catalogues as well as making arrangements for forthcoming conferences.

In August Tommi is attending the 16th World Congress of Applied Linguistics (AILA) in Beijing. China is a really big market for us and as AILA is an important conference it is essential that we attend. While he is there Tommi will be meeting with our Chinese rep to discuss our strategy for the Chinese market. He will report back on how the conference goes later in the summer.

Meanwhile, we have three important European conferences to prepare for in September. Firstly, there’s the British Association of Applied Linguistics (BAAL) conference. This year it’s just down the road at the University of the West of England so we don’t need to travel far to get there! Next is the 21st Annual Conference of the European Second Language Association (EUROSLA) which is in Stockholm, Sweden this year. Our publishing assistant Laura will be staffing our stand at EUROSLA so do go and see her and take a look at our new books. When Tommi has recovered from his trip to China he will be heading to the Seventh International Conference on Third Language Acquisition and Multilingualism (L3) which this year will be in Warsaw, Poland. We sponsor the Best Student Paper Prize at the L3 conference so the winner will be awarded their choice of €100 of Multilingual Matters books. That takes us up to the end of September and after that we will be preparing for the Frankfurt Book Fair.

So that’s what we’ll be doing for the next couple of months. Also, with 4 out of 5 of the Channel View team having their birthdays in August, we generally end up eating an awful lot of birthday cake throughout the summer!


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