From Idea to Published Book: How a Qualitative Tourism Research Book Came Together

This month we published Qualitative Methods in Tourism Research edited by Wendy Hillman and Kylie Radel. In this post the editors give us an insight into how the book came together, from the seed of an idea to publication!

Our book was imagined from an idea that there were no qualitative research books, or the juxtaposition between qualitative and quantitative methods, that is, mixed methods, in Channel View Publications’ Aspects of Tourism series. After much discussion with commissioning editors Sarah and Elinor, we finally put together a proposal for a book on qualitative research methods that are being used and adapted for tourism research. Putting together the original book proposal was relatively easy. However, the questions from the series editors were more difficult!  While they liked the outline of the book, they asked us to provide a bit more information on what would be in each chapter; information about the author of each chapter; and, they asked us to include a chapter on mixed methods, as they felt that readers would want to know how the two diametrically opposed positions of qualitative and quantitative analysis could be brought together.

This was an exciting time for us as, although we had written book chapters before, we had never edited a book, or edited a book together. The commissioning editors had the patience of saints, as we took quite a long time to find others to write chapters, extract their details and bios (from some of them) and put this all into an acceptable format for the newly evolving and extended book proposal. We began by approaching some well-established researchers in tourism that we knew well, and asked them to participate in chapters. This way we were able to find authors for four chapters. We were to write the introduction, a chapter on grounded theory, and the conclusion ourselves. So, we were able to account for seven chapters of the book already – this was exciting!

At the next Council of Australasian Tourism and Hospitality Educators (CAUTHE) conference, we decided to approach early career researchers in tourism; those who had not long graduated with their PhDs, or were in the process of completing their PhDs. This worked really well, and gave the opportunity for up and coming researchers to get “a foot in the door”. We then had eleven chapters, plus the introduction and the conclusion. This meant that we had developed a book that would provide a valuable contribution to research methods in tourism; one that brings together traditional qualitative positioning with current applications in the field.

Along the way, at least one of the authors did nothing, wrote nothing and sent us nothing. This was very disappointing for us. And others also experienced life changes, work struggles, health issues and a new addition to their family. At the following CAUTHE conference, another researcher promised to write one of the (now) missing chapters for us. This went well until we asked for the draft and it transpired there had been a misunderstanding: the author said they thought we wanted a systematic literature review, when we had asked for a chapter on a specific qualitative research approach. We’re not sure what happened there! Anyway, we carried on, wrote the additional chapters ourselves, co-wrote a chapter with one of our research students, and finally got the book to completion. Again, the commissioning editors were very, very patient; and for all their help and extremely good dispositions, we truly thank you!!

While all this took a long time, we have ended up with an excellent product. We have produced a qualitative research book that is distinctive, informative, up-to-date and of value to researchers in any community, not just that of tourism and hospitality research. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed writing and editing it! Happy reading and researching!

Dr Wendy Hillman

Central Queensland University, Australia

w.hillman@cqu.edu.au

Dr Kylie Radel

Central Queensland University, Australia

k.radel@cqu.edu.au

For more information about this book please see our website. If you found this interesting, you might also like Quantitative Methods in Tourism by Rodolfo Baggio and Jane Klobas. 

CAUTHE 2015

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Rosemary Black, Betty Weiler and Sarah Williams

This year I got to escape the February weather in England with a trip to the Gold Coast! CAUTHE 2015 was hosted by Southern Cross University at their Beachside campus in Coolangatta. We were very happy to launch Betty Weiler and Rosemary Black’s book Tour Guiding Research at the conference. Many of our authors were in attendance and it was great to catch up with everyone as usual!

The Tour Guiding Research launch was one of many highlights, others including the welcome drinks at the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary where delegates got to be up close and personal with snakes and koalas! koala

The CAUTHE conference dinner never fails to disappoint, this year there was an excellent Nutbush City Limits routine by many of the delegates and a conga to round things off!

coolangatta beach
Coolangatta Beach

As you’d expect at the Gold Coast the beaches were beautiful and only a short walk from the conference hotels. Definitely useful to clear the head the morning after the gala dinner 🙂 Next year’s conference will be hosted by the Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School in Sydney.

Sarah

CAUTHE 2014, Brisbane, 10-13 February

Story Bridge
Story Bridge

It was the University of Queensland’s turn to host CAUTHE this year and the conference was held in the Sofitel in Brisbane – with a lovely view for us exhibitors of Anzac Square. Noel Scott and his team of volunteers did a great job of organising especially as there were more delegates this year! 

As usual, it was a successful trip for Channel View and a great chance to catch up with a lot of our authors and meet new people.

UQ's YMCA
UQ’s YMCA

There were some thought-provoking keynotes from Stefan Gössling and Ulrike Gretzel and the Great Debate was won by the Aussies this year – in keeping with general sporting results!

UQ arranged for the conference cocktail reception to be held at the Customs House situated on Eagle St Pier, which was a lovely venue with great views of the Story Bridge – designed by the same man who designed the Sydney Harbour Bridge (fun fact!)

The conference finished with a great evening of dinner and dancing – made even better by an awesome YMCA performance from the UQ staff!

 

The Gabbatoir
The Gabbatoir

After the conference I went to watch some cricket at the GABBA – though haunted by the Ashes memories…

We’re looking forward to next year’s CAUTHE which will be hosted by Southern Cross University.

Sarah

Conferences Fast-forward

Again it’s the time of year when we start to think about conferences and leaving our office in Bristol for different cities, countries and climates.  2014 is set to be a bumper year of travel as it seems to be the year when biannual and triennial conferences occur, and some one-off conferences also join our usual schedule.

San Diego Convention Center - location for NABE 2014
San Diego Convention Center – location for NABE 2014

The year has kick-started with CAUTHE and NABE, both of which took place as usual in February.  Sarah and Laura headed off in different directions around the globe – Sarah to Brisbane for CAUTHE and Laura to San Diego for NABE.  Keep your eyes on the blog to read about Sarah’s trip soon. NABE was slightly blighted by the snow storms on the East Coast which meant that several delegates had to cancel their plans, but those of us who did make it enjoyed the Californian sunshine, when we weren’t at the conference of course!

In March, Tommi, Laura and Kim will be at AAAL as usual.  This year’s conference in Portland has a publishing focus, so Tommi will be running a session titled “Publishing your first book: From proposal to published product” in which he’ll outline the process of getting an academic book published, from early preparation and planning, through choosing the right publisher, submitting a book proposal and all the editorial stages to final production, publication, sales and marketing. If you are at the conference and at all interested in this subject please come along to the talk at 12:35 on Saturday.

Our stand at NABE 2014
Our stand at NABE 2014

TESOL in Portland and AERA in Philadelphia are the other conferences in the US which we’ll be exhibiting at this spring.  We will have a whole host of new titles with us at these conferences so do feel free to come over and browse the books and say hi.  We always offer a special conference price on our books to delegates, and this year we’re able to extend that to our ebooks, so there’s all the more reason to come over and say hi!

Other highlights later in the year include the Interdisciplinary Tourism Research Conference in Turkey in May, L3 and the Sociolinguistics Symposium both in Northern Europe in June, AILA in Australia in August and EUROSLA in York, UK to name a few. As ever, we very much hope that you’ll be able to meet us at one of these conferences and hope that you have safe and enjoyable travels too.

Laura

CAUTHE 2013, 11-14 February 2013

Lincoln University
Lincoln University

Ellie and I both attended CAUTHE this year which was very exciting! The conference moved to New Zealand for this year and was held at Lincoln University in Christchurch. CAUTHE was the largest conference (in terms of delegates) to be held in Christchurch since the earthquake in 2011. The opening keynote of the conference was from Tim Hunter, Chief Executive of Christchurch and Canterbury Tourism, who gave a fascinating account of Christchurch’s ongoing recovery and the ambitious future plans for the city. We also had the opportunity to tour ‘the red zone’ in the city centre (where vehicles and pedestrians are currently prohibited) to see the effects of the earthquake up-close.

Elizabeth Roberts winning the Kindle
Elizabeth Roberts winning the Kindle

At this year’s conference, we gave away a Kindle, preloaded with 85 of our books. Elizabeth Roberts, from Southern Cross University, was the lucky recipient after Ellie drew her business card out!

The damaged cathedral in the centre of Christchurch's 'red zone'
The damaged cathedral in the centre of Christchurch’s ‘red zone’

The high standard of papers of past CAUTHEs was continued this year, and the Great Debate (this year, Tourism on the Edge: Slow & Local vs Fast & Global) was again a feature of the conference – the Australasians (Slow & Local) with a resounding victory despite the Rest of the World’s best efforts!

We also had a chance to sample a variety of local Canterbury wines which many of us enjoyed! The conference was brought to a very fun end at Riccarton House, a local heritage site, with more wine and lots of dancing.

CAUTHE returns to Australia next year and we’ll be looking forward to seeing all the usual suspects and hopefully meeting some new faces in Brisbane!

Sarah

CAUTHE 2012, 6-9 February

Such a lovely display

This year’s CAUTHE conference was held at the swanky Convention and Exhibition Centre in Melbourne. It’s nicely situated on the South Wharf and it was great to get out in the evenings for dinner and drinks along the Southbank. Sue Beeton and everyone else involved in organising the conference did a brilliant job and Channel View had another great CAUTHE!

Gladiators ready!

One of the highlights of the conference was the debate on the last day – Australian Tourism: Dying and Beyond a Full Recovery – which was Aussie(ish!) academics v foreign academics. The teams (captained by Michael Hughes and David Airey respectively) and the chair (Larry Dwyer) kept everyone highly entertained – the foreign devils won in the end but kudos has to go to the Aussie team for their lovely outfits…

The very bright dancefloor

The conference finished with a gala dinner at Melbourne Museum (including viewing the great Phar Lap) and included the usual dancefloor-embarrassment on my part – though I blame Paul Strickland entirely for the lip-syncing to the Grease-medley!

Sadly Australia lost...:-)

Happily for me I managed to sneak in some cricket-watching while I was in Melbourne – an amazing atmosphere at the MCG. Watch this space for our cricket and tourism book!

Needless to say, Channel View are eagerly anticipating next year’s CAUTHE debut in New Zealand – hopefully see you all in Christchurch.

CAUTHE 2011, 8th-11th February

Another February, another CAUTHE conference to look forward to – and this one didn’t disappoint. Thanks to the lovely Jenny Davies and her colleagues and helpers at UniSA, Channel View had a very successful conference. It was great to catch up with a lot of existing and potential authors, especially people we don’t get to see at any other conferences through the year. This year we were launching Larry Dwyer, Peter Forsyth and Wayne Dwyer’s new textbook, Tourism Economics and Policy (click here for details). The launch went very well (with a little help from John Tribe!), we sold many copies of the book and am now convinced that if Larry and John ever want to quit academia they could make some money taking a comedy routine on the road.

UniSA did a great job hosting and showing off Adelaide – I’m thinking that holding sessions at wineries should become a regular practice at conferences around the world! There were some really great papers throughout and it was nice to have a chance to get to a few of them, not sure I’ve ever been busier at a conference with so many papers to choose from and sales and ideas for news books. The conference dinner at Adelaide Zoo was a really fun evening, there was much excitement about the pandas, Wang Wang and Funi – think this one is Wang Wang but not entirely sure…

And though the dinner/dancing was equally as fun, still trying to block out my attempted air guitar to the Bon Jovi medley. Channel View can’t wait until Melbourne!