Critical Tourism Studies VII conference, Palma, Mallorca

19 July 2017

Last month Sarah attended the Critical Tourism Studies VII conference in Palma, Mallorca. In this post she tells us a bit about her trip.

Sarah with Heike Schanzel and Brooke Porter – authors of forthcoming book Femininity in the Field

The last CTS conference I went to was CTS II in Split, Croatia so it was high time Channel View attended another one! There is a definite buzz around these conferences and this one did not disappoint, with many high quality papers and a wonderful location.

As always, it was great to be able to catch up with current and prospective authors and meet so many new people with such interesting research underway.

Sarah taking part in the publishing panel

This conference was a first for me as I had been asked (along with the other publishers present) to take part in a panel on editing and publishing in tourism. I already had a great deal of respect for academics presenting their papers on a regular basis but being on the other side of things for once was pretty nerve-wracking (although it was a good experience). I hope the audience members found it as useful as I did.

The conference finished off in style with a beautiful gala dinner and the evening closed with line-dancing to a Spanish-version of ‘Achy Breaky Heart’ – brilliant!

Not a bad setting for a conference!

After the conference it was lovely to spend a day wandering around beautiful Palma – including a trip to the beach!


An Interview with Rodolfo Baggio, Co-author of “Quantitative Methods in Tourism: 2nd edition”

4 July 2017

This month we are publishing the second edition of Quantitative Methods in Tourism by Rodolfo Baggio and Jane Klobas. In this post Rodolfo answers a few questions about the book and the work of a tourism academic.

It’s been six years since we published the first edition of Quantitative Methods in Tourism. What can we expect from the second edition?

First of all let me say that I’ve been quite surprised and amazed to see that our little work received so much attention as to deserve a second edition. We (my coauthors and I) are very grateful to the readers and to find out that our idea of providing a “practical” handbook has worked well. In this edition we have essentially done two things. One has been (rather obviously) to amend the little inaccuracies or errors that inevitably escape in a work like this one, even after a good number of checks. Then we have improved and updated examples and references and added some new materials on data screening and cleaning, the use of similarity and diversity indexes, path modelling and partial least squares, multi-group structural equation modelling, common method variance, and Big Data.

What is the collaborative process like between you both?

For this book (as for the previous edition), after having agreed on the topics to include, we split them based on our expertise and interests so that each one of us wrote the different pieces, then we swapped the chapters and cross checked all the materials.

What is the most rewarding and most difficult thing about writing a book?

The most rewarding thing is for sure the moment in which you get the book in your hands. The most difficult (probably better to say tedious, tiring or grim) comes when you have finished writing and you have to start checking, refining, correcting, reworking, etc.

As a tourism academic, what’s the favourite place that you’ve travelled to in the course of your research?

Contrary to what many might think, working in tourism, whether as an academic or industry practitioner, does not necessarily mean travelling. There are hotel employees that have never seen places different from their hotel or teachers that have never been in a city different from the one in which they give classes. I have been privileged and, due to personal attitude and life chances, have so far had an incredible number of possibilities to travel to many parts of this planet. I do not have a favourite place. All are interesting and exciting in one way or another. Probably my truly favourite place is one (and there are many) in which I have not yet been.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not writing books?

Well, not being a writer most of my life is spent NOT writing books, so I do what anyone else does. Personally I enjoy reading, walking around, listening to good music, travelling and so on. But I also very much enjoy studying and researching new avenues for the difficult work of understanding a complex and complicated domain such as the tourism one.

For more information about this book, please see our website.

 


Celebrating 1000 books in 35 years of Channel View Publications/Multilingual Matters

6 April 2017

With the recent publication of the 6th edition of Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, we hit a real milestone and published our 1000th book since the company began. In this post, Tommi reflects on the last 35 years leading up to this point and discusses how the company and wider world of publishing has changed over time. 

Tommi and David Singleton at the MM drinks reception at AAAL

At the recent AAAL conference in Portland, OR, we celebrated the publication of our 1000th book, the 6th edition of Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, co-authored by Colin Baker and Wayne E. Wright. Since I remember the publication of our very first book in 1982, Bilingualism: Basic Principles by Hugo Baetens-Beardsmore, this led me to reflect a little on what has changed at Channel View Publications/Multilingual Matters (CVP/MM), in the world of academic publishing, and attitudes to bilingualism since then.

Marjukka and Mike at Frankfurt Book Fair

Many of you will know that CVP/MM is a family business, founded originally by my parents in response to being told by our family doctor not to speak Finnish to my brother and me, stating that “they didn’t know what damage they were doing”. Fortunately, being a formidable combination of a stubborn Finnish mother and an entrepreneurial Essex-man father, they not only refused to take such unwelcome advice, they took it as an opportunity to find and publish world-class research focusing on the many positive benefits of bilingualism. Although we now publish in a very wide range of topics – including applied linguistics and sociolinguistics, educational research, language disorders and translation studies under our Multilingual Matters imprint and, under our other imprint Channel View Publications, tourism studies – language rights and positive attitudes to bi- and multilingualism remain at the heart of what we do. We believe that no mother or father should ever be told not to speak the language of their heart to their children without extremely well-informed reasons for doing so.

Although in many cases attitudes towards bilingualism may have switched towards the more positive and even aspirational, this is often only the case if the languages you speak are privileged western languages, and in many cases only if you are of the majority population. It is fine and admirable to learn Spanish or Arabic if you are white, but society might be less positive about you retaining your Spanish or Arabic if you are an immigrant. There is still much work to do in changing attitudes towards languages where these languages are associated with immigration or are minority indigenous languages.

Some of my first memories include sitting under our dining room table, “helping” my parents stick the mailing labels onto envelopes that would carry our first catalogues out into the world. Among the many addresses we sent catalogues to, 252 Bloor Street West stuck in my mind. As a 6 year old child I struggled to understand how so many people lived in this one house! In the years since then I have come to know the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) well, and have got to know the very many authors and friends who are based there. We no longer pack and mail our catalogues ourselves, this is one of those tasks that computers and automation have simplified, but as the editor of my local orienteering club newsletter I have to pack and mail all the copies to our members, so I like to think that I have retained those valuable skills!

The office in Clevedon before everything was done on computers

In 1982 we were already using computers for journal subscription processing, but all correspondence with authors and editors was by mail. We used to do so much mailing back and forth that the local post office gave us our own postcode! All of our records were kept in large filing cabinets and a system of racks, T-cards and folders would track the process of book and journal manuscripts from initial proposal to published book. Sales reports from our distributor would be couriered once a month to us in a large box, and even as recently as the late 1990s we would wait with excitement to go through the monthly sales reports and see how well our books had been selling. These days everything we do is reliant on computers, the internet and data. We only have to log in to our distributors’ reporting sites to get the sales figures from the day before, and we can communicate easily even while travelling. This availability of data and immediacy of communication brings with it a new set of demands and challenges. There is a sense that we must respond to everything as quickly as possible and that we absolutely have to know how many books were sold in the last 24 hours. A lot of time is taken up by responding to queries that in the past would have waited for a single letter, and of course we put the same pressures on to other people.

In the early days of our company the only reliable way to purchase books was via the bookshop, or to put a cheque in the post with an order form from our catalogue. These days the rise of companies like Amazon, Books etc. and the Book Depository, as well as our own website, means that wherever you are you should be able to order a print copy of our books and have it posted to you quickly. If you choose to purchase an ebook, you can place an order now and have the full text, even in some cases with embedded video files and links to relevant websites and resources, delivered direct to your computer, tablet or reading device within seconds.

Libraries are able to buy one multi-user license of a digital book, which does not degrade with age and usage, and are able to share this with multiple users of the library, even off-site users of the library, at the same time. Shelf space is making way for more computer spaces and learning environments, and university campuses are changing accordingly. Of course the downside of this is that the number of copies required to service the same population has fallen, and so in general across the publishing industry we have seen the total number of sales of any one academic title fall quite dramatically in the past 10 years or so. Since the majority of overhead and fixed costs of publication have not fallen, this means that book prices have risen much faster than inflation in order to cover those costs.

While it is interesting to look at what has changed, it is also very instructive to consider what has stayed constant over all this time. Digital technology and distribution has meant that the barriers to entry into the publishing industry have fallen dramatically. In a world where anyone can write, typeset and publish a book relatively quickly, easily and inexpensively, the role of the publisher in providing a measure of review, revision and quality control is just as important as it was in 1982. It is arguably even more important now, given the recent attention to fake news stories and alternative facts. CVP/MM has always believed in reviewing manuscripts thoroughly and as transparently as possible, and while peer-review is not a flawless system, it is a vitally important step in ensuring that the books we publish can be trusted by students, researchers, parents and policy-makers.

Flo, Sarah, Anna, Tommi, Elinor and Laura

We continue to grow as a business, this year we will publish 60 titles across all of the various subject areas, where just 10 years ago we would schedule 30 titles. But we remain a small and friendly operation with approachable staff. We have fostered an atmosphere where we can thrive and grow within our jobs, and so our staff turnover is extremely low. It is highly likely that you will deal with the same people through the life of your book project, if not your whole career! You will have seen me at every AAAL for the past 19 years, but you may not be aware that Sarah and Anna will this year celebrate their 15th anniversary of working for Multilingual Matters, and Elinor and Laura are not that far behind. Our most recent full time colleague, Flo, already feels like part of the family, and our intern, Alice, reflects the values that we all share.

Although my father, Mike, is no longer around to see the progress we have made since he and my mother, Marjukka, retired, he would still recognise everything that we do and be proud of how we have continued to build on what they started 1000 books ago. We would not have been able to publish 1000 books if it wasn’t for the many authors, series editors, reviewers and readers who have contributed in so many different ways. There are too many to name here, but I hope you know just how important you are to us. It has been a pleasure to work with you all and I hope that you will continue to partner with us, to work with us and to hold us to account when we do occasionally get things wrong, so that as we go on to publish books together we can all grow and improve, and look back on the next 1000 books with just as much pride!

Tommi


Johan Edelheim introduces his new book Tourist Attractions

30 September 2015

This month we published Tourist Attractions: From Object to Narrative by Johan Edelheim. Johan has discussed the main themes of his book in this short video clip.

Please see our website if you would like more information about Johan’s book.


An Interview with Tej Vir Singh, editor of Challenges in Tourism Research

7 August 2015

This month we published Challenges in Tourism Research, a comprehensive volume in which renowned scholars discuss contemporary debates within the field of tourism studies. The book is based on ‘Research Probes’ originally published in the journal Tourism Recreation Research. In this post the editor of the book, Tej Vir Singh, answers a few questions about the book.

Critical Debates in TourismWhat makes the ‘Research Probe’ format of this book so unique?
Intelligent use of collective wisdom of known multi-disciplinary scholars, strategic application of elenctic approach (debates, discussions and discourse), quintessential knowledge at one place, interesting readability, and direction for future research.

How does this book complement the previous volume Critical Debates in Tourism?
It complements Critical Debates in Tourism by identifying leftover problems (vast tourism cannot be confined to one volume) – more, it meets the needs of freshers and juniors.

What is your next research project?
Ah!! Next project? Possibly a magnum opus of tourism….

What do you find rewarding about editing books?
The joy of creation and dissemination of knowledge plus scholars’ satisfaction with the book.

What advice would you offer to other academics editing their first book?
They should identify the demand of the curricula and market needs; it might be better that they undertake a preliminary training course in editing.

How would you compare the experiences of writing a book and writing a journal article?
Almost the same – just like writing story or a drama.

Do you find that the role of books in the tourism research community has changed over the years? Are they valued more or less today than they were a decade ago?
Can’t say precisely, but I can speak about tourism, where books are more valued than the journals, specially in the Third World.

9781845413415For more information about the book please see our website. You might also be interested in Critical Debates in Tourism.


Animals and Tourism

30 May 2015

Animals and Tourism edited by Kevin Markwell was published earlier this month and offers a fascinating insight into the relationships between tourists and animals.

Photo: Brian Gilligan

Most of us can probably remember an encounter we’ve had with some kind of animal while on holiday. Maybe it was watching in amazement at a humpback whale launching its massive bulk out of the ocean or admiring a flamboyantly coloured parrot dodging the trunks of trees as it flew, unerringly, through an otherwise verdant rainforest. Perhaps it was simply an exotic looking butterfly, delicately landing on some equally exotic tropical flower in the garden of a resort you might have been staying at.

When you start to think more deeply, you soon realise that animals are incorporated into many of our tourism experiences; sometimes willingly, other times, not so willingly. They entertain us at tourist attractions such as zoos and aquaria; they provide transport at some destinations; most of us eat them as part of the local cuisine; we photograph them; we buy souvenirs that look like (or in some cases, are made from) them; and increasingly, many of us are taking our own cats and dogs with us while on holidays.

And not to forget the animals that annoy and irritate us such as mosquitoes and midges, ticks, and centipedes, and those which may present a threat to our safety – scorpions and venomous snakes as well as lions and tigers and bears. Oh my!

Animals and TourismThe book, Animals and Tourism: Understanding Diverse Relationships, emerged from a growing interest, which many scholars now share, in understanding critically the dynamics of our relationships with non-human animals. These relationships are often contradictory, ambiguous, inconsistent, and, increasingly, contested. The tourism arena is an ideal place to place these relationships under scrutiny because of the variety of relationships that exist.

I was fortunate enough to be joined in this book project by 22 well-qualified authors who contributed 16 chapters which I then organised into three themes: ethics and animal welfare, conflict, contradiction and contestation and shifting relationships. The topics that the book covers are quite varied and chapters cover issues like the ethical implications of the use of animals such as elephants and killer whales in tourism performances or as hunting targets, the paradoxes associated with eating ‘game meat’ within the context of safari tourism, conflicts between various stakeholders in bird-watching tourism, the potential of the creepy crawlies, insects and spiders as tourist attractions and the ramifications of travelling with a pet dog, among others. Case studies and examples are drawn from all over the world including Australia, Brazil, Hawaii, Papua New Guinea, Africa and the US.

Photo: Kevin Markwell

I think the book sheds light on a number of important issues. There is a tendency in tourism to think of animals as ‘products’ or ‘commodities’ that are made available for our touristic pleasure and enjoyment. The interests of the animal are often regarded very much as secondary to the interests of the paying tourist. Often tourists are unaware of these issues and in doing so, maintain a market for performing elephants or photographic opportunities with gibbons and pythons. Yet, there are also examples where tourism can play a positive role in the conservation of species and we must not lose sight of this capacity of tourism to contribute to conservation and education.

Animals and Tourism aims to make a contribution to a better understanding of the intersections of animals and tourism, but as will be made clear in the book, there is still so much more to understand!

For further information about the book please see our website.


Tourism Essentials

24 April 2015

This year we have launched our new series Tourism Essentials which complements our existing tourism book series Aspects of Tourism, Tourism and Cultural Change and Aspects of Tourism Texts.

The new series aims to focus on key topics in the field of tourism studies and the books will provide an essential resource for tourism students and researchers.

Tourism and OilThe first book in the series is Tourism and Oil by Susanne Becken which was published in January. It is the first book to examine oil constraints and tourism and offers an analysis of the economic implications of increasing oil prices for tourism and discusses key dimensions relevant for tourism in a post peak oil world. Richard Butler describes it as “a measured and realistic appraisal of tourism in the future in relation to the availability or otherwise of oil.”

Tourism and WaterFollowing this, the next book in the series is Tourism and Water by Stefan Gössling, C. Michael Hall and Daniel Scott which was published earlier in April. This volume is a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between tourism and water. Michalis Hadjikakou from the University of New South Wales, Australia calls the book “a quintessential addition to the sustainable tourism literature.”

For more information about the series please see our website.


CAUTHE 2015

27 February 2015
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Rosemary Black, Betty Weiler and Sarah Williams

This year I got to escape the February weather in England with a trip to the Gold Coast! CAUTHE 2015 was hosted by Southern Cross University at their Beachside campus in Coolangatta. We were very happy to launch Betty Weiler and Rosemary Black’s book Tour Guiding Research at the conference. Many of our authors were in attendance and it was great to catch up with everyone as usual!

The Tour Guiding Research launch was one of many highlights, others including the welcome drinks at the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary where delegates got to be up close and personal with snakes and koalas! koala

The CAUTHE conference dinner never fails to disappoint, this year there was an excellent Nutbush City Limits routine by many of the delegates and a conga to round things off!

coolangatta beach

Coolangatta Beach

As you’d expect at the Gold Coast the beaches were beautiful and only a short walk from the conference hotels. Definitely useful to clear the head the morning after the gala dinner 🙂 Next year’s conference will be hosted by the Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School in Sydney.

Sarah


CAUTHE 2014, Brisbane, 10-13 February

4 March 2014
Story Bridge

Story Bridge

It was the University of Queensland’s turn to host CAUTHE this year and the conference was held in the Sofitel in Brisbane – with a lovely view for us exhibitors of Anzac Square. Noel Scott and his team of volunteers did a great job of organising especially as there were more delegates this year! 

As usual, it was a successful trip for Channel View and a great chance to catch up with a lot of our authors and meet new people.

UQ's YMCA

UQ’s YMCA

There were some thought-provoking keynotes from Stefan Gössling and Ulrike Gretzel and the Great Debate was won by the Aussies this year – in keeping with general sporting results!

UQ arranged for the conference cocktail reception to be held at the Customs House situated on Eagle St Pier, which was a lovely venue with great views of the Story Bridge – designed by the same man who designed the Sydney Harbour Bridge (fun fact!)

The conference finished with a great evening of dinner and dancing – made even better by an awesome YMCA performance from the UQ staff!

 

The Gabbatoir

The Gabbatoir

After the conference I went to watch some cricket at the GABBA – though haunted by the Ashes memories…

We’re looking forward to next year’s CAUTHE which will be hosted by Southern Cross University.

Sarah


Critical Debates in Tourism

15 August 2012

Today marks the publication of Critical Debates in Tourism edited by Tej Vir Singh which is a comprehensive volume encompassing the key issues in tourism research. Tej Vir Singh is the founding Director of the Centre for Tourism Research and Development in Lucknow, India and established the Centre’s international journal Tourism Recreation Research.

This new volume brings together the key researchers in the field and provides a multidisciplinary examination of the fundamental debates of tourism studies. It covers topics ranging from the relevance of mass tourism, voluntourism, slow tourism, the impact of climate change, the dilemma of authenticity as well as tourism ethics. This book is unique in its format and will be an essential resource for tourism scholars and practitioners.

Noel Scott from the University of Queensland calls it: “A must for those wanting to get to grips with the key tourism debates” and John Tribe from the University of Surrey describes the volume as ” a fascinating book…highly recommended.”

Critical Debates in Tourism is part of our Aspects of Tourism series which aims to provide readers with the latest thinking on tourism world-wide and to push back the frontiers of tourism knowledge. For more information on this series or to discuss ideas for a proposal please contact the commissioning editor Elinor Robertson.

Lecturers who are considering using the book for the courses they’re teaching can order an inspection copy of the book by clicking here.

For further information on this title or any other books on tourism studies please see our website.


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